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, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reforms, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis. and get our economy going again and to create jobs. so right now, all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it's time for the president, congressional democrats, to tell the american people what spending cuts they're really willing to make. with that i'll take a few questions. >> speaker boehner, why will you not tell democrats what specific spending cuts you would like to see, especially within en titlements? >> it's been very clear over the last year-and-a-half, i've talked to the president about many of them. you can can look at our budget. where we outline very specific proposals that we passed in last year's budget and the budget from the year before. we know what the menu is. what we don't know is what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. >> so your 2011 position still stands then? are you still o
and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our countries debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now, all eyes are on the white house. our country does not need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really going to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [inaudible question] >> we have outlined very specific proposals that we passed in last year's budget and the budget before. we know what the venue is. what we do not know is what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [inaudible question] >> i am not going to get into the details. it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur. we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. [inaudible question] >> no, no, no. stop. i have to tell you, i am disappointed in where we are. i am disappointed in what has happened over the last couple weeks. with the
house is in fact open to having spending cuts as part of this discussion in the fiscal cliff talks. i think what is going on here is the white house heard the criticism and they are trying to breathe some new life into these talks. politico reported there was a phone call between the president and speaker boehner. they claim it was curt as in a short call that did not go well. jay carney just pushed back and said it was a 28-minute phone call. he said it was frank and direct. and it was good, it was positive. they believe, the white house does, that they are making progress. but i pressed jay carney. i said will spending cuts be included? and here is what he said. >> can you hold up that budget, look in the camera and say to your fellow democrats on capitol hill, vote for and include some of these spending cuts in this deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? because that's not what they are doing. should they include those? >> yes. and i know that democrats accept that there -- this has to be a balanced package that includes revenues and cuts and spending cuts. >> reporter: so news the white
the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. >> reporter: at the white house. >> this is available not just here but to everyone in the world who has an internet connection. and i know things are done the old fashioned way sometimes on cap
developments out of the region, but first tonight, urgent developments on the fiscal cliff show down. tim guy ne geithner announced of of the white house that we would, quote, absolutely go over the fiscal cliff which would trigger tax cuts and spending increases unless taxes increase on the top two percent of wage earnings. >> i want you you to understand when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy. if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthy. >> all right. it appears the very definition of the american dream is now being rewritten by president barack obama. now, today our commander-in-chief publicly said he's not going to play games with the fiscal cliff, but that is just not reality. right now the president is playing a very dangerous game of chicken and this is with your paycheck and the american dream. meanwhile, the republicans have allowed themselves to get caught in a circular firing squad. they're negotiat
was trying to frame the battle oaf the fiscal cliff as being all about taxes. with no mention of spending cuts. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rates from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one. that is good for the american economy. >> republicans believe the reason the president is going light on spending cuts and demanding the budget deal include another increase in the nation's debt ceiling is clear. >> this isn't about getting a handle on the deficits or debt for him. it's about spending even more than he already has. >> white house aides reject republican claims that holding the debt limit over the president head is the only mechanism to get him to trim spending. >> you are going to keep the debt limit goes higher and you're spending money. you and congress. >> president signed in law, $1 trillion in spending cuts. there is a specific proposal to achieve $600 billion in savings from our entitlement programs. including our healthcare entitlement program. jay
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
cliff on new year's day. that would mean automatic spending cuts and the expiration of tax cuts for most americans. president obama sent his top negotiator to the treasury secretary. tim geithner to capitol hill today. he met with leaders of both parties. republicans say they made no progress. and surprise, each party blames the other. >> the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. and, secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. >> republicans know where we stand. we have said it, we have said it, we have said it so many times the president said the same thing. it's been weeks, at least two weeks since we met at the white house and are still waiting for a serious offer from the republics. >> shepard: after his meeting with secretary geithner the senate minority leader mitch mcconnell said of administration officials quote today they took a step backward moving away from consensus and closer to that cliff. ed henry is live at the white house for us tonight. ed we are getting new informatio
to listen in a little more to see what he has to say about the fiscal cliff and otherwise. >> entirely on spending cuts, or a variation that has emerged is that we can do so while still lowering rates by closing loopholes and deductions. and you've heard from my team but let me just repeat. we don't have any objection to tax reform, tax simplification. closing loopholes, closing deductions, but there is a bottom line, an amount of revenue that is required in order for us to get a real, meaningful deficit reduction plan that hits the numbers that are required for us to stabilize our debt and deficits. and -- [. [no audio] kwroe. jenna: we gave it our best shot. sometimes we can't do it. the president speaking at the white house at the business roundtable about the economy. fiscal cliff certainly the issue in the short term for a lot of big businesses and certainly for a lot of american taxpayers. however, long term is another story when it comes to the economy, and entitlements, the president referring to that as well. as we continue to get that feedback you can check it out
spending decreases if you go over the fiscal cliff than if you deal with president obama. >> greta: well, it appears to many in the city that it's politico check mate for the president. if we go over the fiscal cliff, what it means is the taxes will go up on the wealthy, the big earners. it also goes up on the middle class. i assume the middle class will look to the rawp republicans foe fact that their taxes come up so political check mate. >> i'm not so sure. president obama could avoid that very simply by putting maybe two or three to one expenditure reductions on the table for revenue increases, something like sim responsibl simpson bow. he has a formula given to him by a commission he appointed and he's totally rejected that formula and presented to the republicans a program which was basically just a massive tax increase over and above the massive tax increase that's going to take place with the bush tax cuts expiring, so i don't see where there's -- he hasn't given them room to compromise. maybe if he had put his tax increases on the table and put up expenditure reductions of, you
to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different than what's on the table there. $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that is two times the amount in the boehner pl
a deal on that fiscal cliff. just 31 days left until we hit those $7 trillion in automatic spending cuts and tax increases if negotiations break down. and both sides of the aisle are going straight to the public in order to plead their case, or rather tell us why the other side is to blame. this is president obama in his weekly radio address. >> both parties say we should keep middle class taxes low. the senate has already passed a bill to keep income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to do the same thing. and if we can just get a few house republicans onboard, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. but it's unacceptable for some republicans in congress to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they refuse to let tax rates go up on the wealthiest americans. >> in the republican response, senator orrin hatch takes th s hostage metaphor one step further and brings to mind a memorable movie scene. >> unfortunately, some on the other side of the aisle are offering a disastrous thelma and luiz strategy that would take u
more focused on washington, on the whole policy issues around the fiscal cliff because they are trying to figure out their spending plans guessing what taxes will be. businesses are focused on if they spend x and taxed at y what's that going to leave them in terms of profitability. degree of which businesses have come off a really good four years where the rest of us have come off a more problematic four years. finally in this quarter partly because of the fiscal cliff, partly because of europe, partly because of slow down in china profits are more challenging for companies. but they are still making a lot of money. >> "wall street journal" study of 40 major companies half plan drastic cuts to their investments and spending into next. once a budget deal is reached, i mean whatever it is, do you think we'll see companies loosen their wallet? is there a bigger chance they will slow down more? >> part of this is contingent how well consumers do. companies will spend money if there's this active healthy consumer base that justifies them spending money for more activities. so, at some point
of about 9% across defense and all domestic spending. that is the fiscal cliff. we shouldn't be dealing with other issues that are long term in order to avert the cliff as it were. that is immediate crisis. we have long term situation --. bill: but you know when lawmakers get a little bit of rope, you know, when they get time to think about it and push it off to the next year, it never gets done. this budget proposal, there are many who wonder whether or not even democrats could support it. the last budget that came from the white house went to the senate, it went 98-0 against it. no one voted for it. melissa: well, that was kind of a tricky parliamentary issue as well but, i do take issue with one thing, the idea we haven't dealt with entightments. we had two years, a year and a half we debated medicare. we made significant changes in medicare. we just had a campaign which republicans including governor romney time after time after time charged that we had cut $616 billion in spending out of medicare and we reformed the program. we have looking toward new ways to compensate providers.
, and spending cuts that many believe would be a fiscal cliff that would kick in on january the 1st. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel is watching it all unfold on capitol hill. what do we know about the visit about the expectations for what might happen during it. >> reporter: martha, timothy geithner arrived here on capitol hill a short time ago to meet first with senate majority leader harry reid. we know he's having individual meetings with the top four leaders of congress. what republicans have said they want to hear, and republicans will be critical, because they need republican support to get any final fiscal cliff deal through the senate, and also through the house, they say they hope that he's coming with concrete spending cut ideas that are acceptable to the administration. one of the meetings today will be with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell who a short time ago sounded pretty fired up. >> the only reason democrats are insisting on raising rates is because raising rates on the so-called rich is the holy grail of liberalism. their aim is not job he tkraoe a
cuts that would be imposed by the fiscal cliff would be devastating. it would send unemployment higher. it would cost jobs. the republicans, as peter says, are going to insist on some cuts anyway, so bottom line is we are going to see a weaker economy into the beginning of next year. probably one way or the other. now, the counter to that, peter, is that there are forces in the economy that are strengthening it. this energy boom that we've got, the natural gas, the amount of fracturing that we're doing, the fact that housing has been doing tremendously well, and interest rates remain very low with prices, so there's some sense that there's a bit of a renaissance on the horizon, and if the government doesn't mess that up too much, 2013 could end up being as good as 2012 if not a little better. i don't know if you completely disagree with that, peter, but i think there's enough good going on that it could offset the bad. >> to you think it could go up to 10% unemployment. do you agree with peter on that? >> i don't know. i don't know if it will go go up to 10%. there are two scenarios. o
and the so-called cliff, fiscal cliff, he also wants to deal with raising the debt ceiling which caused so much controversy a year and a half ago. take a listen to the president today. >> if congress in any way suggests they are going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes, and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation which by the way we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> now, republics may not want to include the debt ceiling extension lifting that ceiling in these negotiations because the ceiling doesn't need to be lifted for a couple more months. if they come back next year and deal with that part of this, they might have more leverage as we get closer and closer to that deadline to force the president into more spending cuts than he wants right now, harris. >> harris: well, editor all those americans wondering and watching rights now, 27 days, how close are we. we heard the speaker say he is waiting to hear back from the white house. i would think that would be in the form of a counter offer from
and they will play for us this morning. we begin this morning with the so-called fiscal cliff one from today unless washington gets its act together 90% of americans will see their taxes rise as a series of tax increase and spending cuts take effect. yet negotiations between the white house and congressional republicans are at a standstill. anna werner is in our washington bureau. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. unless congress comes to an agreement on the fiscal cliff it would mean a tax hike plus some $65 billion would be cut from the pentagon and other government agencies. both sides are hoping for a compromise. but so far all there's been is debate. >> i've been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. >> reporter: president obama took his fight to the public while visiting a toy company in pennsylvania where he warned republicans not to play scrooge. >> it's not acceptable to me and i don't think it's acceptable for you for a handful of republicans to hold middle class tax cuts held hostage. >> reporter: the white house proposal includes $4 trill
the white house fiscal cliff package. the white house's proposal to avoid the big tax hikes and spending cuts that are going to happen in january, unless something is done. that proposal has come under heavy criticism from republicans who say wasn't serious. how speaker john boehner said he was flabbergasted. mitch mcconnell reportedly laughed out loud and in this debate over reducing the debt, the president is pushing for an additional $255 billion in spending. he wants those higher taxes to spend more, which is leading to some criticism. joining me now is brad blakeman, the former deputy to george w. bush. and chairman of the south carolina democratic party. a deal that is all about the republicans desire to cut back on the debt and deficit -- why would the president be proposing $255 billion in war spending? >> well, he's not. what he is proposing is shifting spending priorities. after those cuts, shifting priorities, and by the way -- this is infrastructure development. this is to make sure that people who have gone the payroll tax relief keep that payroll tax relief and expanding un
that fiscal cliff house republicans are now offering up a plan of their own to avert that combination of spending cuts and tax hikes. it's set to welcome us all on january 1st if they don't have an agreement. i'm jenna lee. jon: some kind of welcome that would be. i'm jon scott. within hours of seeing the proposal the white house slammed the g.o.p. offer saying quote their plan provides nothing new and provides no details on what deductions they'll limb nature, loopholes they will close or which medicare savings they would achieve. house speaker john boehner inc insists his offer is the best one on the table calling it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. jenna: mike emanuel is with us. certainly a challenge to find this ideal plan. what is holding it up. >> reporter: the chairman of the senate budget committee wants a large come proceed hence i have deal in the range of $5 trillion and says a grand bargain can get done if everybody kaoels cool and doesn't overreact to every valley over the net. he this is a camp david-style summit might help things
's economy goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. the white house and congressional republicans said to be deadlocked. president obama released his plan. it includes 1.6 trillion dollars in new tax increases. 50 billion in new stimulus spending. and stimulus, and new power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. tim geithner, john boehner appearing with chris wallace on fox news sunday. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to get this question resolved but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking the whole entire time. >> in kind of a tough position now. it is going to be, obviously a little hard for them now. they're trying to figure out where they go next. we might need to give them a little more time to let them go next. we did what you expect from us. we laid out a very detailed, carefully designed set of spending savings and tax changes that help put us back on a path to fiscal responsibility. bill: where are we
cliff. we now know that we're 29 days away before the massive spending cuts and tax increases go into effect automatically the beginning of the year. the white house presented their plan and now just today we're getting news on the side of the republicans. ali velshi, chief business correspondent, let me bring you in. the first major difference, let's be crystal clear and run through this proposition, the fact that they want to extend the bush era tax cuts for everybody. >> right. something that some 67% of americans said that they don't agree with, something the white house says is a nonstarter. however, they have put a proposal forward. i suppose if you're negotiating, you don't put first proposal forward, the one you're going to end up with. this is from house speaker john boehner in a 2 1/2 page letter to the president, it proposes $2.2 trillion in cuts. and let me show you how they get there. $800 billion in tax reform. that is closing loopholes and credits. $600 billion in health care and medicare changes. $300 billion in other mandatory savings. $300 billion in discretiona
hill as the fiscal cliff looms now just 32 days away. house speaker john boehner says no progress has been made in two weeks of talks, and republicans want the white house to come up with significant spending cuts. senate democratic leader harry reid responded to boehner saying, quote, i don't understand his brain, unquote. >>> when those talks over the fiscal cliff seem to be heading towards a stalemate but do the capitol hill theatrics tell the whole story? here's thousand politico summed it up, listen to top democrats and republicans talk on camera and it sounds like they could not be further apart. but behind the scenes top officials who have been involved in the talks for many months say the contours of the deal are starting to take shape. well, joining me are jason johnson a political professor, t and a republican strategist ron bonjene, ron, let's start with you, both sides know they'll have to make a deal. one congressman says to get it there has to look like this was fighting this way it's kind of like managing the public's expectati expectations, oh, we didn't give anything,
as well. >>> topt get right to it. the big battle over the fiscal cliff getting increasingly contentious. as we know, time is running out. just 27 days to go until more than $500 billion in automatic spending cuts and tax hikes actually kick in. now, the president, he is standing firm saying there's not going to be a deal medicals taxes for the wealthiest americans go up. the president is offering $400 billion in cuts from entitlements, but he also wants to spend $50 billion more on infrastructure. go to house speaker john boehner. he is offering $800 billion in increased revenue. he also wants much deeper cuts in entitlements and $800 billion in other cuts many spending. we've got reporters -- i want to start off with you. dana bash on the hill. a standoff here, republicans essentially saying, look, the president is not being reasonable here, and then you have the white house saying this is magic beans and fairy dust. is this a lot of posturing here? are we really at an impasse? >> yes to both of those questions. there is a lot of post urg, but we do seem to be at an impasse. i want to
newsroom, i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." i'm going to tell you what others won't about the fiscal cliff. the head of starbucks said it will damage the u.s.'s reputation and shenanigans from capitol hill and with a cool 500 bucks to spend, should you use them now for a share in apple? apple says it will build some of the iconic mac computers in the u.s. listen to what apple ceo tim cook said to nbc's brian williams. >> so we've been working for years on doing more and more in the united states. next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> but apple stock has been singing the blues for a few months. plummeted 25% off the all-high and a beating this week. 6.5% lower yesterday. apple up more than a percent today. kurndly around $544 a share. is now a good time to get in. you're all asking me. i'm asking katie stockton in connecticut. katie, is apple stock down off its high a phenomenally successful stock to hold for so many investors and showing the chart again. you look at technical trading patterns in the stock. do they tell you it's time to buy, sell
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)